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Peter Stockland

Peter Stockland is Senior Writer with Cardus, and publisher of Convivium. Read More ›

Articles by Peter Stockland
  • Finding Normal

    Peter Stockland

    Publisher Peter Stockland highlights the resonance of the upcoming release World Youth Day Krakow: A Pilgrimage of Mercy.  

  • Carry On Questioning

    Peter Stockland

    Today Publisher Peter Stockland reflects on the importance of asking honest, essential questions about democratic life. 

  • Door To Door

    Peter Stockland

    Publisher Peter Stockland reflects on the virtue of common decency and how the act of just holding a door for one another can remind us of what truly matters.

  • Thinking About Law

    Peter Stockland

    Although Cardus has been attentive to legal issues for years, this week marks the launch of a formal research program called Cardus Law. Convivium sat down the Executive Director Ray Pennings and program director Andrew Bennett to find out how will seek to raise the bar on public understanding of law in Canada. 

  • The Path Now Taken

    Peter Stockland

    Convivium publisher Peter Stockland finds a hole in a fence and follows a path built by determined pedestrians. What he discovers is not only a shortcut to Saint-Henri metro but also the common life of the quartier’s present, all the way back to its past.

  • #81: Noteworthy Viola Desmond

    Peter Stockland

    Having Viola Desmond grace Canada’s $10 bill is unquestionably a good thing. It will become a great thing, however, only if it helps us overcome the grave thing it reveals.

  • Laughter and Light

    Peter Stockland

    As the son of a father from Norway, I became acutely aware early on of the worldwide shortage of Norwegian comedians. A dark land of small population, with a cold-water coast, fish for supper, and Swedes for neighbors, Norway simply lacks the raw materials for export-grade mirth. Historically, as a result, its people have cultivated exceptionally fine gradations of seriousness ranging from to blank white taciturnity to cloud grey stoicism.

  • The Church at Mid-Day

    Peter Stockland

    Photographer Vinny Ciro’s wide view from the rear of this church at mid-day creates a sense of movement up the aisle as the closest pews shift in our peripheral vision and we are directed inexorably forward to the altar and upward toward the shadowed wooden vault above us. 

  • Post Truth Tough Potatoes

    Peter Stockland

    In the hoary Soviet-era joke, Vladimir and Estragon are sipping vodka during shift break at the nuclear power plant when they spy an ad in Pravda for GUM – the Soviet Union’s state department store chain.

  • Light

    Peter Stockland

    Light, essence of holiness and mystery, nudges our eyes from the illuminated pillars to the shy crook of the first boy’s arm, past the vivid reds of his robes and those of the middle boy, to the broader, taller third boy who appears in Sasin Tipchai’s photograph as the other dimension of holy mystery: shadowed, different, apart.  

  • Listening Through Literature

    Peter Stockland

    To one of those historical moments when the political air is pullulating with the shrieks of five-alarm banshees from all sides, American academic Mark Lilla just added a massed choir of air raid sirens.

  • Young Nun in Prayer

    Peter Stockland

    Skilled use of shallow depth of field in this Tusita Studio image brings immediate attention to the deep concentration on the face of the young nun, letting us follow the line of her nose to the downturn of her mouth so that we can imagine the flow of breath at the heart of all prayer and meditation. 

  • The Tower of Song

    Peter Stockland

    There has long been a short story mulling in my head about the ghosts of Saul Bellow and Mordecai Richler meeting by the St. Lawrence to fight over which is the greatest Montreal-born writer. Their dukes drop when Leonard Cohen strolls by in the flesh humming a few bars of Suzanne .

  • Softly Lit Synagogue

    Peter Stockland

    ​The strong line of the wood with its illuminated edge starting in the bottom right corner divides this Shpeizer photograph of a softly lit synagogue almost into two images. Light spilling across the image from the side window directs our attention to the central arch, where unity is found again. 

  • Apocalypse Not Yet

    Peter Stockland

    The world, we are told, is about to end in the aftermath of this week’s U.S. election. Partisans on both sides predict apocalypse based purely on presidential choice. By contrast, recent days north of the border have brought, if not perfect achievement of peace, order and good government, then two heartening incidents of prudence, wisdom and hope.

  • Speech on Campus Censored for Preferred Pronouns

    Peter Stockland

    A leading academic from McGill University in Montreal has turned up the heat on the University of Toronto for its treatment of dissident psychology Professor Jordan Peterson. Douglas Farrow, McGill’s Professor of Christian thought and holder of the Kennedy Smith Chair in Catholic Studies, lambastes U of T administration in an open letter for trying to “compel [Peterson] to adopt the linguistic habits of those with whom he profoundly disagrees,” namely transgender activists who want to be addressed by their pronouns of choice.

  • Navigating True Compassion

    Peter Stockland

    Against a culture that too often reduces compassion to a mushy pulp of tear-sodden Kleenex, Bonnie Tompkins knows it can require the implacable honesty of death itself. From her upbringing as a New Brunswick farm girl to the five years she spent as a caregiver to the terminally ill love of her life, Tompkins has taken into her soul the understanding that both living and dying well demand the maximal directness that a given moment can humanely bear.

  • Ecclesiastes

    Peter Stockland

    “Vanity, vanity, all is vanity and a breath of wind,” the Teacher says in the Book of Ecclesiastes. In Stephen Radford’s photograph of this English church, no breath disturbs the pages of the Bible or its red ribbon page markers. The candles are extinguished. The world beyond is but a blur; we look in vain to make sense of it.

  • Curving Highway

    Peter Stockland

    Forest. Path. Mountain. Light. Alejandro Gonzalez's photograph of a highway curving into the distance near Valdes Alaska brings together the four essential elements of spiritual journey. The road at the centre challenges us to move from the limitations of the enclosed forest’s darkness and obscurity toward the welcoming light, rising to the height where Heaven touches down. 

  • 'Til Death Do Us Part' Might Delay Death

    Peter Stockland

    Susan Martinuk has been a medical researcher and research-based writer for most of her adult life. It takes a lot to raise her eyebrows. Yet Martinuk says she was taken aback by data in her latest publication for Cardus on the indisputable link between healthy marriages and healthy lives. Beyond established statistics affirming that connection, she says, were the results of a study from 2013 showing wedded bliss can even boost cancer survival.

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