Law

  • Open Wide and Say Law

    Faye Sonier and Kiely Williams

    Calgary physician Dr. Kiely Williams and Ottawa lawyer Faye Sonier show how the expansion of MAiD has given lawyers medical authority while silencing doctors who consider it very bad medicine.

  • HELP to Redefine MAiD

    Tara Vreugdenhil

    Speech-language pathologist Tara Vreugdenhil breaks down the definitions that make up medical assistance in dying and determines it’s really homicide masquerading as health care.

  • The Unlawfulness of Lockdown

    James Sikkema

    Contrary to theologian David Hionides, James Sikkema argues no one has a moral obligation to obey COVID-19 lockdown orders and that civilly disobeying them is justified.

  • A Plan to Unmake MAiD

    Peter Stockland

    A former veteran Mountie and local coroner has a sure-fire way to protect health care workers from being made to administer MAiD. So why won’t anyone answer Sean Murphy’s call? Peter Stockland reports.

  • Great Reset? Or Grand Unravelling?

    Peter Menzies

    Prime Minister Trudeau has mused that COVID-19 will allow for Canadian society to “re-set” on a number of fronts. Peter Menzies says we’ll have to avoid coming apart at the seams first.

  • The Perils of Facing Down Facebook

    Peter Menzies

    Canada’s federal Heritage Minister needs a better grip on who he’s dealing with before shaking his fist too often at Mark Zuckerberg’s social media colossus, Peter Menzies writes.

  • Laws and Lawn Signs

    Peter Stockland

    After a two-member pro-life group was investigated for providing campaign volunteers in the 2019 federal campaign, Peter Stockland reports on a likely legal challenge under the Charter in the near future.

  • Canada At Its Best

    Rabbi Reuven Bulka

    Rabbi Reuven Bulka praises the integrity and wisdom of all sides in a legal bid to accommodate a Jewish candidate’s religious convictions by changing the federal election date.

  • Cracks in Canada’s Media Freedom

    Susan Korah

    The good news, Convivium contributor Susan Korah reports, is Canadian journalists aren’t murdered like their global colleagues. The bad news is subtle intimidation and harassment that lets the powerful keep their secrets.

  • Judicial Idiosyncrasy

    Barry Bussey

    Lawyer Barry Bussey, who argued as an intervenor in the Trinity Western University hearings last winter, says Canadians must demand their legislatures protect religious freedom from a Supreme Court that seems to have lost its way.

  • The Charter Circle Game

    Raymond J. de Souza

    Some argue the Supreme Court left the Charter a wreck and a tangle with last week’s Trinity Western decision. But our Editor in Chief Father Raymond de Souza has a former Justice tell him it’s all part of making equality Canada’s concentric centre.

  • Trinity Western Loses

    Peter Stockland

    Trinity Western University has lost its legal battle to have graduates of its proposed law school accredited by law societies in Ontario and B.C.

  • A Wall Between Church and Court

    Janet Epp Buckingham

    Convivium contributor Janet Epp Buckingham explains this week’s unusual Wall case in which the Supreme Court said judges have no business telling churches how to decide who belongs. It’s a positive outcome for religious freedom, she says, though less far-reaching than other anticipated rulings will be.

  • The Law Society of Orwell

    Albertos Polizogopoulos

    Ottawa lawyer Albertos Polizogopoulos is saying “no” to the Law Society of Ontario’s demand for a written statement of principles obliging lawyers in the province to promote equality, diversity and inclusion. Here’s why.

  • LGBTQ AT TWU

    Matthew Wigmore

    As a Trinity Western University grad and member of the LGBTQ community, contributor Matthew Wigmore urges caution about seeing tomorrow Supreme Court hearing strictly as a legal fight over religious freedom. 

  • Defending Trinity’s Right To Exist

    Evan Menzies

    Tomorrow’s Supreme Court of Canada’s hearing on Trinity Western University should engage all Canadians confronted by the State’s chipping away at fundamental Charter rights, warns alumnus Evan Menzies.

  • Trinity Western Wishes

    Peter Stockland

    Tomorrow, Prime Minister Trudeau offers an unprecedented apology to persecuted members of sexual minorities. On Thursday, Trinity Western University is before the Supreme Court of Canada arguing for its religious freedom. Having previously presented TWU's perspective, Convivium asks lawyers Mark Berlin and Douglas Judson about sexual politics and the law.