History

  • The Year of Smashing Statues

    Gavin Miller

    Along with COVID-19 and a sanity-challenging American election, 2020 made rampant the demolishing of monuments. Gavin Miller warns iconoclasm is more than vandalism: it threatens civil life.

  • Is Politics Putting POGG on Ice?

    Don Hutchinson

    Canada’s Constitution gives paramountcy to peace, order and good government (POGG), but Don Hutchinson argues bills on conversion therapy and medically assisted death prioritize progressive expediency.

  • Throne Speech is a Matter of Confidence

    Don Hutchinson

    Convivium contributor Don Hutchinson sets up resumption of Parliament by explaining the historical significance of the Speech from the Throne – and its potential political pitfalls for Justin Trudeau.

  • Blueprints for God’s Hotels

    Peter Stockland

    Raymonde Gauthier, co-curator of a current exhibit at Montreal’s Hôtel Dieu museum, explores with Peter Stockland how the 19th century partnership of Bishop Ignace Bourget and architect Victor Bourgeau shaped the city’s spiritual landscape.

  • The Everlasting G. K. Chesterton

    Peter Stockland

    Retiring this summer after 46 years as editor of the Chesterton Review, Father Ian Boyd tells Peter Stockland why the great Christian journalist has such enduring appeal and importance.

  • Sharing Memory Matters

    Peter Stockland

    Energy wasted defending or toppling statues should instead power a national conversation about what, why and how we collectively commemorate our pluralistic pasts, Peter Stockland writes.

  • The Unbearable Whiteness of Jesus

    Don Hutchinson

    Questions about the Christian Messiah’s skin colour offer a fascinating complex of archeological, historical, migratory, linguistic and theological answers that ultimately won’t matter, Don Hutchinson writes.

  • Division and Hope

    Rebecca Darwent

    On the feast of Pope St. John Paul II, we need to heed his messages of hope, courage and conviviality in the aftermath of a divisive election, writes Convivium's Rebecca Darwent.

  • Ireland's Accidental History

    Peter Stockland

    In this week's essay from Northern Ireland, Convivium's Peter Stockland encounters a young man whose grandfather was murdered on Bloody Sunday 1972 and waits to hear loyalist-unionist drums beat again in Belfast this Friday, July 12.

  • From Failing Hands We Throw

    Peter Stockland

    Thursday marks the 75th anniversary of D-Day. But, writes Convivium Publisher Peter Stockland, there is urgency this time we remember: we are at risk of forgetting the sacrifice that earned the freedom we still enjoy today.

  • Mere Journalism

    Peter Stockland

    The role of history is to remind us that the truth can only emerge from what has come before us. Where we were still matters, writes Convivium Publisher Peter Stockland, if only so we can more truly understand where we are.

  • Patriots and Parliaments

    Peter Stockland

    The New England Patriots won yet another glorious football victory on the 100th anniversary of the first Irish republican parliament being founded. Convivium Publisher Peter Stockland argues the apparent coincidence is providential proof of the power and necessity of great institutions.

  • Remembering What We Do Not Know

    Rachel Feddema

    In her review of Natalie Morrill's debut novel The Ghost Keeper, Convivium's Rachel DeBruyn reminds us that although abundant historical fiction has already been set in the World Wars, fiction retains the power to express truth even where facts are lost.

  • Welcome to Year Zero

    Andrew Bennett

    By removing a statue of Sir John A. Macdonald, the City of Victoria has gone down the perilous path of erasing history rather than learning from it, Rev. Dr. Andrew Bennett argues. What next? Renaming Montreal’s Trudeau airport because the former PM formally called for assimilation of Indigenous Canadians?

  • Montreal Irish Ready To Fight

    Alan Hustak

    Convivium contributor Alan Hustak reports from Montreal on the construction plans slated for the mass grave of 6,000 Irish who died in the mid-19th century of famine.