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Assisted dying: When what if becomes what isAssisted dying: When what if becomes what is

Assisted dying: When what if becomes what is

This may seem a distant concern for a far off time dependent on the abstract whims of judges and lawyers breathing rarefied Ottawa courtroom air. It isn’t.

Peter Stockland
1 minute read
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If tone and body language are at all reliable indicators, within the coming year, Canada’s Supreme Court will strike down current laws against assisted suicide.
 
The justices hearing the Carter case on Oct. 15 gave no visual or audible signs of sympathy to the federal government’s argument that the laws ruled constitutional in the 1993 Rodriguez case should still be deemed constitutional 20 years later.
 
By contrast, those on the bench appeared eagerly engaged by the position of opposing counsel that Criminal Code prohibitions against counselling suicide and assisting suicide violate the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Chief Justice Beverley McLachlin and Justice Rosalie Abella were particularly active in querying the “blanket prohibition” of the current law, and its contribution to the “suffering” of those who want help to kill themselves.
 
Read the rest of this article at the Calgary Herald website.

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