Diversity

  • Warming up to Educational Equality

    Democratic principles demand that Ontario’s private schools be welcomed into a respectful partnership with public education, Derek Allison writes in a research paper of Cardus

    What is Ontario going to do about its private schools? The need for a serious policy review has been growing since June 1984 when then-premier William Davis rose in the legislature to announce funding for the province's Roman Catholic high schools, which, f...

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  • What's all the fuss about Trinity Western University?

    A group of us at Trinity Western started working in earnest on a proposal for a law school over five years ago. We visited American Christian law schools. We read books on the latest law school theories. We developed a vision, then a framework, then a curriculum to support the vision. We met with lawyers, judges, professors, and law deans in Canada.

    "Not again!" That's all I could think when I started getting emails a few weeks ago that there was a new campaign against accreditation of TWU's law school.

    A group of us at Trinity Western started working in earnest on a proposal for a law school ov...

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  • God's Preferential Option for Public Schools? Some Questions

    I'm not even talking about Allison Benedikt's over-the-top manifesto ("If You Send Your Kid to a Private School You Are a Bad Person"). For more on that, I refer you to Hubert Krygsman's earlier post here on the Cardus Daily.

    The "justice generation" has a new target, and a new badge of honour. The target of their criticism is Christian schools, or more specifically, parents who send their children to Christian schools. And their new badge of honour is their own d...

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  • Private Schools and Public Good

    Whether intended tongue-in-cheek or not, Allison Benedikt's article in Slate magazine, entitled "If You Send Your Kid to Private School, You are a Bad Person" has generated much stimulating—and sometimes fruitful—discussion. Using it as a heuristic tool for further reflection, one of its benefits is that it helps to expose a fundamental confusion inherent in suggesting a "public vs. private" conflict when it comes to education. if every single parent sent every single child to public school, public schools would improve. This would not happen immediately. It could take generations. Your children and grandchildren might get mediocre educations in the meantime, but it will be worth it, for the eventual common good.   

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  • What Kind of Teachers Do We Want?

    What kind of teachers do we want our children to learn from?

    Our kids are heading (back) to school. Across provinces and states, parents are once again delegating, for a time, a portion of their educational duties to teachers of all stripes and persuasions.

    What kind of teachers do we want our children to lear...

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  • Bright Days Ahead for Faith-Based Universities?

    Perhaps not, and you'll be surprised which schools may now have the inside track on market share and influence.

    It's a traditional path, rich and straightforward. Our university education is about us: our positioning, our prospects, our increased earning power. But if we set our ...

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  • Private Schools, Public Education

    Yesterday, I spent a few hours with a prominent journalist-turned-academic who took some issue with this line of argument.

    "A Rising Tide Lifts all Boats," argues the Cardus Education Survey 2012 report released last week. The graduate data from non-government school sectors in Canada are evidence that public education—educatio...

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  • Sick Schools, Sick Students, Sick State

    Let's start with the superintendent, Ms. Nancy Pynch-Worthylake, and the school board. Young William Swinimer wore a bright yellow t-shirt emblazoned with the words "Life is Wasted without Jesus" to school. Those words offended another student, who complained to the vice-principal, who asked William to remove the shirt. The National Post reports that the vice-principal considers the words on the shirt "hate-talk." There is more to the story, of course: the boy says that he had been "bullied" about his faith prior to this incident; the school maintains that he was suspended not only because of the shirt, but because of his defiance of the principal's order; and the school says it is "expected that students will not wear clothing with messages that may offend others' beliefs, race, religion, culture or lifestyle."

    There is an illness plaguing our public school systems. And like a runny nose in a kindergarten class, it spreads quickly. When public schools become sick, it's usually not too long before the whole nation becomes sick. The whole sad debacle ...

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  • Whose Children Are They, Anyway?

    Constitutional lawyer Kevin L. Boonstra analyzes a recent Supreme Court decision on parental rights. What he finds make him very nervous.

    In 1964, the Quebec government took charge of public education, which until then had been dominated by religious communities. For the next 30 years, the denominational school system remained in place.

    In 1995, the Quebec government created a commissi...

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