Canada's Premier Hub For Faith In Common Life
 

The Line On Brad Wall

Last week, Premier of Saskatchewan Brad Wall announced his imminent retirement from politics after 10 years. Today, Convivium contributor Alan Hustak helps readers understand what this announcement could mean for Saskatchewan and Canada. 

3 minute read
The Line On Brad Wall August 15, 2017  |  By Alan Hustak
Like Convivium? , our free weekly email newsletter.

Subscribe to our weekly newsletter

Convivium Weekly: Our wrap-up of notable news, ideas, and images— sent by email. Get Convivium Weekly delivered to your inbox.

Brad Wall spent almost 10 years as Premier of Saskatchewan by following the Johnny Cash formula for political success: he walked the line.

Perhaps that’s not so surprising. Wall, 51, once managed a country music museum in Swift Current. As premier, he knew what it took to govern with “a little bit country, and a little bit rock n’ roll.”

There was magic in the mix. When he abruptly handed in his resignation last week after nearly a decade in power, Wall remained the most popular leader in the land. He was respected inside and outside the Saskatchewan Party he helped create. He remained an unabashed social conservative who managed to keep from being singed by the hot button issues that have scorched other small ‘c’ leaders.

He never walked in a gay pride parade. Yet he allowed the rainbow flag to fly at the Saskatchewan legislature. He was no fan of gay marriage, but kept his own counsel on the subject, feeling no obligation to use it to appease the conservative religious base. At the same time, he took the unusual step of invoking the Charter’s notwithstanding clause to override a court ruling ending the province’s funding of  26 faith-based institutions.

As Saskatchewan’s population, and its influence on the national scene, grew during Wall’s tenure, he walked the fine line between common sense and political correctness.  On policy, he was a pragmatist. His passion was for the province he loved, and its rural values. He could be a hard-line economic partisan who rejected the idea of a carbon tax simply because he believed it was a bad fiscal deal for Saskatchewan. Indeed, he threatened to take the federal government to court over the issue, arguing the tax would “kneecap” the provincial economy.

Paradoxically, after winning three elections with his deftly balanced approach, he was victimized by falling commodities prices. To contain rising deficits, he brought down a belt-tightening budget in March that left many wincing in pain.

It raised the provincial sales tax by six per cent, eliminated rural bus service leaving thousands of dependant lower income users stranded, and proposed funding cuts that would have gutted libraries. Wall’s popularity has taken a hit as a result, though he still leaves with a 50 per cent approval rating.

Still, the opposition NDP, which has yet to pick a provincial party leader, has come within striking distance. It may well overtake Wall’s old party if Charles Clark, the young and popular Roman Catholic mayor of Saskatoon, chooses to enter the race. 

 Whether Wall chose to leave at the top of his game to allow his party to renew itself before the next election in three years, or whether he decided to stumble away before it went down to defeat, is anyone’s guess.  

In recent months he appeared to have lost his lost his energy and enthusiasm so his resignation was not entirely a surprise. He had made it abundantly clear that he believed 10 years of walking the walk as premier was enough. His decision to step down raises questions about his own path ahead, but even more about his successor and the future of the Saskatchewan Party itself.

Wall was able to smooth the rough edges of the party, a coalition of right-wing conservatives and liberals that he helped to build 20 years ago. There are concerns the party could melt down and return to its extreme right wing roots without him to keep it on the straight and narrow.

As far as Wall himself goes, some federal Conservatives are known to covet him as a potential future MP. Federal Opposition leader Andrew Scheer, a Saskatchewan MP, is more pragmatic. Wall, Scheer believes, is truly “finished with politics.”

Mind you, how many times have we heard that political line before?

Convivium means living together. We welcome your voice to the conversation. Do you know someone who would enjoy this article? Send it to them now. Do you have a response to something we've published? Let us know!

YOU MAY ALSO ENJOY
  • What journalists are supposed to tell

    Peter Stockland

    I return to Canada from a week abroad to discover that the Canadian media are resurrecting Jack Layton. At least the Globe and Mail and CBC are. Late Monday afternoon I watched CBC's The National anchor Peter Mansbridge, in a caricature of gravitas, promoting his "exclusive" interview with Layton's widow, Toronto N.D.P.

  • The Liberal Future

    Ray Pennings

    In the next few months, Liberal voters will elect Ontario's next Premier, Quebec's Opposition Leader, and the leader of the third party in Canada's Parliament. The impact of these races amount to more than the sum of their parts. One might argue that the decisions made by Liberal voters in the next few months will, as much as any other factor, shape the ultimate resolution of Canada's current decade of dissensus.

JOIN CONVIVIUM

In a secular age, there is a push to strip the public square of all signs of faith. But freedom of religion and freedom of expression are the bare basics for a people to call themselves free. Convivium is a voice for the rightful role of faith and for people of faith in our pluralistic society.

Join us by following Convivium on Facebook and Twitter, by subscribing to our free newsletter, by telling your friends about us, and by donating to the cause.

Like Convivium?

, our free weekly email newsletter.