Diversity

  • Cancelling Wisdom’s Colour

    Daniel Dorman argues that the phenomenon of cancel culture emerges from a black and white vision of the world that forgets the vivid hues moral struggle brings to life.

    “The line separating good and evil passes not through states, nor between classes, nor between political parties either -- but right through every human heart -- and through all human hearts. This line shifts. Inside us, it oscilla...

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  • Indigenous Women Ascending

    Peter Stockland sees the appointment of Mary Simon as GG, the election of RoseAnne Archibald as AFN National Chief, and Jody Wilson-Raybould’s political courage as hope for Canada.

    Thursday’s fifth ballot win that made RoseAnne Archibald the first ever female National Chief of the Assembly of First...

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  • How MAiD Aids Ableism

    Bill C-7’s expansion of medical aid in dying encodes into law discrimination against disabled Canadians by treating them as less worthy of life than the able-bodied, Keith Dow writes.

    Complex networks of roots stretch several times beyond the radius of each tree’s canopy, drawing nutrients and water far from its origin. While we may quickly observe the location of a trunk, or the reach of extended branches, these roots are often invisibl...

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  • Saying “Non” to Potpourri Pluralism

    There’s much wrong with increasingly closed secularism in France and Québec yet both societies understand diversity requires strong ground rules, Robert Joustra argues.

    Unity and civility can be abusive demands when placed on us by the powerful. But diversity and pluralism, likewise, are also not self-evident goods. The hallowed middle ground – a modest unity – is the sacred but lost country so many multicultural explorers...

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  • The Unbearable Whiteness of Jesus

    Questions about the Christian Messiah’s skin colour offer a fascinating complex of archeological, historical, migratory, linguistic and theological answers that ultimately won’t matter, Don Hutchinson writes.

    Questions about the whiteness of Jesus, White presence in Bible times, and the whiteness of the North American Church have become widespread in public debate during recent months. It’s not that there wasn’t already discourse about these points, but discussi...

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  • China's Imperial Brutality

    The death sentence handed to a Canadian convicted of drug smuggling reminded the world that China is the world’s top state executioner. But as former MP and veteran human rights observer David Kilgour tells Convivium readers, Beijing’s vicious persecution of its own minority populations rivals Maoist-era inhumanity.

    About 20 million Muslim and Turkic-speaking Uyghurs, who make up the largest community in China’s far-west province of Xinjiang, are facing brutal repression by police and others acting on behalf of the Beijing government.

    After Mao Zedong occupied X...

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  • Giving Thanks, Living Faith

    Father Raymond de Souza sees in the kerfuffle around U.S. Senator Elizabeth Warren’s claim to Native heritage an example of truth being an act of faith for which we should be thankful.

    On this American Thanksgiving, as our neighbours reflect upon the blessings of their bountiful land, and their debt to those who went before them, it is a fitting occasion to ask what we know about our own ancestors. What we know is an act of faith, and tea...

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  • Building Better Christian Bridges

    In a recent talk for Ottawa’s Theology on Tap speaking series, Cardus program director Andrea Mrozek examined myths and misunderstandings that divide Catholics and Protestants. She reminded her audience of C.S. Lewis’ admonition that we are faithfully waiting, not sullenly camping, until unity is restored.

    Picture a little girl in a pink dress and black patent shoes. She’s almost five years old. Something of significance has happened, though she isn’t really sure what. It’s the day of her baptism. Someone would have told her what baptism is. But she doesn’t f...

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  • The Peterson Protests

    Father Raymond de Souza was at a speech given by Jordan Peterson, perusing the foreword to the best-selling author’s latest book, when the mob erupted outside the hall at Queen’s University in Kingston.

    It’s sometimes hard to distinguish the show from the sideshow. Both came to Queen’s University last Monday, in the person of Jordan Peterson and those who profess outrage at the professor. 

    The show was the inaugural installment in a new law school l...

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  • Religion's Perception Gap

    With today's release of the fourth major Angus Reid Institute polls on the state of religion in Canada, Cardus Executive Vice-President Ray Pennings says the biggest identifiable gap is between Canadians' positive lived experiences of faith and their negative perceptions arising from narratives about spiritual belief. 

    Convivium: The results coming out today are from the fourth Angus Reid Institute polls done on the state of faith in Canada. What’s the most important finding, and how do these results fit with those that have come before?

    Ra...

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  • Home Schooling’s Lessons For Education

    Cardus Senior Fellow Deani Van Pelt, and Cardus Education Program Director Beth Green, contend that proponents of misperceptions about home schooling should read up on the ample evidence of its benefits.

    Back-to-school means different things for Canada’s five million school-age children. For an increasing share of students in almost every province, it means something other than attending a neighbourhood public school. Homeschooling, while still small in ove...

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  • Distinctly Quebec Education

    Analyzing data from the Cardus Education Survey, program director Beth Green fills Convivium readers in on the “distinct, positive advantages” of religious schools in Quebec. Find the link to the original research in the article. 

    Analyzing data from the Cardus Education Survey, program director Beth Green fills Convivium readers in on the “distinct, positive advantages” of religious schools in Quebec. The full report is available here...

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  • Perpetuating Homeschool Myths

    The Globe and Mail ran a story on the dispute between the Alberta government and the Wisdom Home Schooling Society of Alberta, which has been shut down due to alleged financial irregularities. The story was framed around the story of Bari Miller, a 23-year old Masters student in the University of Ottawa’s political studies program. Ms. Miller was home-educated in the Wisdom program from grades 2-12 and clearly doesn’t think much of what she was taught. The lack of oversight and standards were among the reasons that “at 17, Ms. Miller ran away from home, escaping her mom and the education program she deemed shoddy.” From that single anecdote, the Globe constructed a narrative about homeschooling that goes far beyond any alleged financial irregularities in one particular situation in Alberta.

    Homeschooling is back in the news, but as usual, the tone of the coverage is negative. I suspect that’s due, in large measure, to journalists simply being unaware of what a wealth of research has shown about the value of homeschooling. Allow me to explain b...

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  • Challenging Trinity Western University: When the Law is Inconvenient

    Think about that: $10,000 per hour to argue a case which is almost identical to a case decided by the Supreme Court of Canada in 2001. The issues were the same. The questions were the same. In fact, one of the parties, Trinity Western University (“TWU”), is the same.

    I was in Halifax last week for the appeal hearing on Nova Scotia Barristers’ Society v. Trinity Western University et al. The hearing, which went from Wednesday through to Friday, included three main parties, ten interveners, five Court of Appeal j...

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  • Time for a national conversation on parental choice in education

    Parents and children should be at the heart of education, not teachers or cumbersome regulation. National School Choice Week, spearheaded by our neighbour to the south, offers a chance to highlight examples of school diversity already on offer in Canada’s provinces and to renew the call for a national conversation on parental choice.

    Written by Beth Green (Cardus Program Director, Education), and Ben Woodfinden.

    Parents and children should be at the heart of education, not teachers or cumbersome regulation. Na...

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  • A School and a Church at the Heart of a City

    Thriving cities depend on good relationships. People need to be connected to institutional and social resources. Good connections depend on education, transparency, and accountability. As my colleague Milton Friesen wrote, “Faith-based organizations have a unique role to play in knitting together the social fabric of the city.”

    What is it that makes a city? Judging by the ones I’ve visited lately—London, Abu Dhabi, Chicago, Sydney—it is global finance and skyscrapers. When people show off their cities to you, they might often take you to a glamourous, redeveloped dockland and nod ...

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  • Common Good & The Classroom

    Even when closing schools seems an economic no-brainer, communities should fight back.

    Counting All the Costs of School Closures By Milton Friesen

    In a letter to the Ministry of Education in February of this year, Toronto Mayor John Tory waded into the current debate over what to do with underutilized school b...

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  • The Conversation: Law, Loyola and the Common Good

    Earlier this year, the Supreme Court of Canada declared the government of Quebec had breached the religious freedom of Loyola High School, a private Jesuit institution in Montreal. Paul Donovan, who led the seven-year legal battle as Loyola's principal and who became its president in April, spoke with Convivium publisher Peter Stockland about the implications of the decision for Canada's faith in common life..

    CONVIVIUM: I wanted to ask you a first question from your perspective, not as the former principal and now new president of Loyola High School, but as a citizen who's just gone through a very arduous, seven-year legal process. You took on t...

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  • School Choices

    In North America, the terms “education” and “public education system” get treated as though they mean the same thing. When we remind people that education is bigger than the public system, it changes the conversation in a big way. Reframing our concerns opens up the options and suggests that a variety of parties—associations, providers, schools, and, even more importantly, families—have a stake in education.

    It’s School Choice Week.

    In North America, the terms “education” and “public education system” get treated as though they mean the same thing. When we remind people that education is bigger than the public s...

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  • Strong Communities, Strong Educations

    An interesting part of Cardus*U is attending weekly workshops animated by high-profile guests. This past week's session on strategic planning for creating sustainable, significant change was led by Peter O'Donnell, founder and president of ...

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