×
More Web Thinker ThoughtsMore Web Thinker Thoughts

More Web Thinker Thoughts

Do we think we know everything (or at least everything that matters)? That will invariably influence how we interact with people and evaluate ideas. Do we work from a posture of humble unknowing? That will change us in other ways. People who are watching digital culture have plenty to say about how technologies like this one are changing us.

Milton Friesen
2 minute read
Like Convivium? , our free weekly email newsletter.
 

Christina's post on web thinkers coincided with with this Sir Ken Robinson video on collaboration from Toronto's Artscape. You can see the trimmed 6 minute video here. The type of thinking, our idea orientation, our posture of engagement, whatever you want to call it, makes an enormous difference in our relative ability to learn, grow and undertake valuable projects together.

Do we think we know everything (or at least everything that matters)? That will invariably influence how we interact with people and evaluate ideas. Do we work from a posture of humble unknowing? That will change us in other ways. People who are watching digital culture have plenty to say about how technologies like this one are changing us.

On Tuesday Rob and I attended a Sig@MaRS meeting featuring Louise Pulford from the Young Foundation in the UK. Among our many conversational pathways coming out of that meeting was a sense that the real test of collaboration is the ability to work constructively with a wide range of diverse people, ideas and perspectives.

Current technologies seem, at least on the surface, to foster less regional and rigid thinking because we are more aware of what is happening elsewhere. However, the highly individualized intake that digital media allows contributes to highly divergent consumption styles and less real-time collaboration, potentially affecting our ability to work with actual people in face-to-face settings.

Technology alone cannot make us better collaborators. There are deep cultural, moral and personal influences that underwrite our ability to work together on projects that benefit all of us. And there are postures of mind that prevent us from doing so. The networking and information sharing power of online technologies may be a significant factor in that process but does not act in isolation.

We will get better at collaborating and thinking laterally as we collaborate and think laterally—both as individuals and across organizations and institutions. Cultivation of these abilities will be critical, whatever the medium of interaction.

You'll also enjoy...

Time to take the Gulag out of Research

Time to take the Gulag out of Research

First, significant amounts of university research never reach the places that need the knowledge We need new platforms that improve the flow of academic research ...

Universities and the Death of Cloistered Knowledge

Universities and the Death of Cloistered Knowledge

People involved in higher education reflect on change often and at length but outside of the institutions themselves, we are not talking enough about what the university is, what it might be, and what it should be Along with reflections on industrialization, education, media, and the public square, ...

Join Convivium

Convivium means living together. Unlike many digital magazines, we haven’t put up a digital paywall. We want to keep the conversation regarding faith in our common and public life as open as possible.

Get a weekly wrap up of the latest articles delivered right to your inbox.