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Living in the FutureLiving in the Future

Living in the Future

Among those characteristics of ultramodern life are ubiquitous, featherweight jumpsuits; food machines; three-day telecommuting workweeks; "voice phones"; and a total lack of pollution and crowded highways.

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Topics: Cities, Literature
Living in the Future January 18, 2010  |  By Alissa Wilkinson
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A friend linked to the endlessly fascinating "2010: Living in the Future". The site's creator dug out a book he'd read as a child, written in the 1970s by Geoffrey Hoyle (who, the site tells us, appears to still be alive), about what life would be like in 2010.

Among those characteristics of ultramodern life are ubiquitous, featherweight jumpsuits; food machines; three-day telecommuting workweeks; "voice phones"; and a total lack of pollution and crowded highways.

It's bizarre to see how many of these are sort of approximately close to the truth, and just how many are way off, at least in the circles I frequent. (I don't own a jumpsuit, and my bed is not set into the floor, but I suppose there are people who do live that way.)

It's also interesting to see how much a better (one might even say more redemptive) view of the world this author hoped would appear by this year—but how many of these social problems are, indeed, finally being recognized in the mainstream. Reasons to keep working?

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