André Schutten

André Schutten is General Legal Counsel with the Association for Reformed Political Action (ARPA) Canada since 2011. He has the mandate of equipping the Reformed Christian community for political action on a broad range of issues. He also conducts regular analysis on the implications of different government bills and court judgments and acts as ARPA's chief Parliamentary lobbyist. André completed his Master of Laws degree in Constitutional Law through Osgoode Hall Law School in 2013. He lives in Gatineau, Québec with his lovely wife Karyn VanDooren, an accomplished artist and art consultant. They are active members of Jubilee Church where André is church organist.

Bio last updated June 30th, 2021.

André Schutten

Articles by André Schutten

  • Carter, Charter, and Magna Carta

    In striking down laws against physician-assisted suicide, the Supreme Court of Canada used the Charter of Rights to eviscerate 800 years of legal wisdom first captured in the Great Charter—or Magna Carta—and based on the immutable link between God and the rule of law.

    The appellants, in their successful bid to strike down Canada's absolute prohibition on assisted suicide, argued not only that the prohibition violated the right to life, liberty and security of the person (protected under section 7 of the Charter) but also that it violated the section 15 equality r...

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  • Imposing On Whom?

    So, if Christian Horizons, as an effective institution doing good work at a good price, should nevertheless be banned from engaging in the work they do simply because they are a group of Christians (instead of a more nebulous, indistinct group), then what is the deeper implication of such a policy? ...

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  • A Long Way from Inclusive

    One need only look to religious schools, an obvious manifestation of the "false" public and communal type of religion outlined by Sullivan, to see how unaccommodating the Rest of Canada can be The accommodation of religion in the "Rest of Canada" is not that stellar ...

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  • Woulda, Coulda, Shoulda in Whatcott

    The Supreme Court’s recent ruling on hate speech could have been better — but it also could have been a whole lot worse, say Albertos Polizogopoulos and André Schutten.

    Many free speech advocates were hoping that the Supreme Court of Canada would overturn its earlier decision in Taylor and strike out the hate speech provisions of the Code as being an unconstitutional violation of freedom of expression While the Criminal Code definition of "hate speech" in Keegstra ...

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